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Ganoderma

Magic Mushroom of Royalty

Ganoderma is a reddish colored, hard and healing mushroom used in traditional Oriental remedies for a wide range of wellness applications. Its most popular and well-known species, Ganoderma Lucidum, is recognized as Reishi to the Japanese people, Lingzhi to the Chinese and Youngchi in Koreans. Many Centuries ago, the mushroom was extremely uncommon. The Royals of China kept the Ganoderma for independent from the rest of the population and regarded it as more useful than silver, more valuable than jade.

Healthy Eastern Medicine Supplement

Now, Ganoderma is typically developed and usually absorbed in several ways such as in nutritious and health products, as well as in drinks like exquisite coffees or rich teas. With about 80 types or species in existence throughout the world, Ganoderma is a mushroom that usually develops on trees and has been substantially used as an element in conventional therapeutic methods in a lot of China. Advocates of the use of Ganoderma declare that the mushroom has qualities that allows it hold cholesterol levels normal, restrain high blood pressure, reduce physical weakness, reduce dangerous inflammations, develop strong constitution and endurance, as well as increase the body’s natural immunity and defense mechanisms. It’s regular for the mushrooms to be used for cooking as well, but Ganoderma is actually bitter tasting in its natural form.

Rare Mushroom

It is wonderful that Ganoderma has so many advantages but the real factor here is that it is an unusually rare mushroom. It is rare enough that in a natural environment of 10,000 plants, you’ll discover it in about two of the deceased stumps or trees. Mostly growing on the lower parts or bases of the dead trees, Ganoderma is usually situated in jungles in South America, Europe, Africa and North America. Since the fungi is very hard to discover out in the wild parts of the world, it is instead developed in interior setups with very controlled and exceptional results.

Western Medicine Demands Proof

Western Medicine will not accept anything without evidence-based science behind a remedy’s claims. Using the scientific method, it has been found that Ganoderma is certainly related to these health benefits:

• Enhanced blood and fluid circulation

• Reduces pressure and inflammation so you can more quickly rest and stay calm, attempting to explain its calming influences

• Helps prevent and battles off various types of cancer

• Detox and cleanse with anti-oxidants, eliminating out poisons that ruin your body

• Increases energy and provides a real feeling of being energized, as subjective data from test results consistently shows.

• Increases the body’s defense mechanisms, strengthening the Immune System and decreasing instances of bacterial infection or viral flair-ups.

The Perfect Complimentary Taste

Due to its naturally bitter taste, another bitter tasting food used for energy comes to mind.
Coffee is the perfect addition to the use of Ganoderma. It complements the exquisite taste of full roasted, dark coffee beans. Imagine a coffee that rolls on the tongue like the most robust of Columbian blends but contains all the strengths of the amazing Ganoderma. You do not have to imagine it, as there is a superior option to the gross and substandard (and obviously with less health benefit) fast food coffees.

The Royal Supplement

Ganaderma is a supplement that has energized and detoxified for thousands of years, a true magical mushroom used by Asian Royalty. Today you can enjoy the benefits these Royals enjoyed, but you can have it in a superior tasting form – in a robust, succulent coffee, truly fit for Emperors, but it is an even better fit for regular men and women too.

See more at Doctor Coffee

Could our diet be killing us, even when we say we are on a diet?

It is interesting to note that of all the cultures around the world, people in the western hemisphere tend to be dying the fastest. And what is killing them? LIFESTYLE DISEASES.

Every day the print and electronic media are saturated with the latest fad in diet and weight loss secrets. We are bombarded with a plethora of ads promoting the next miracle
drug
to keep us healthy or just to restore the youth we once had. Sad to say that at the end of the day we are left with a burdened health care system and a bludgeoning debt because we continue to listen to experts after experts telling us how to make them rich by participating in the next health craze.

Ever wondered why most of the experts and even most doctors dont get sick and die like the rest of us. Could it be something that they know and we don’t? Then again, I looked at a certain group of people and realize that very few in any of them die from the dreaded cancers that threaten to wipe out our western cultures (breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer). have you ever noticed that the so-called poor people rarely suffer the effects of such diseases? I wonder why.

In a recent study of Chinese culture, it was stated that cancer was considered a rich man’s disease. This is because novelties such as ice cream, chocolate bars and cheeses were only available to the elites of the society.

Isn’t it interesting that in a WHO study, the number of men contracting prostate cancer in rural China was a measely 0.5 men in every 100,000. On the other hand however England, Scotland and Wales had a figure over 70 times higher. Don’t you think that this is a disease that attacks the wealthier and higher socio-economic groups, those that can afford to eat “rich food”. So the question begs an answer; Are we killing ourselves?

Did you know that the Chinese do not share our pre-occupation with milk and other dairy products? Did you know that apart from cats and dogs, humans are the only other beings that consume another animals milk? Do you notice that after a certain age, babies no longer drink their mothers’ milk? Doesn’t that tell us something?

The Chinese consume in addition to their plant based diet, a lot of sea weed. A staple in Asian diets since ancient times, seaweeds are among the healthiest foods on the planet, packed with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. And now we know they’re great for the waistline, too: A 2010 study found the algae can reduce our rate of fat absorption by 75 percent, thanks to its inhibitory effect on a digestive enzyme called lipase.

Maybe we should take a lesson from our Asian friends and start cutting back on our dairy intake. Our lives depend on it.

There is much more to honey than just being edible.

There is much more to honey than just being edible.

While the sweet taste and smell of honey has attracted fans of every age group, there is much more to honey than just being edible. Women are normally the first to search for alternatives in healing, and home remedies using honey are used for everything from a sore throat to sleep disorders. If you are a woman that prefers a natural home remedy over other methods of curing, then you will be interested the wonders of honey and its natural healing factors. Always remember that babies under the age of one cannot ingest honey, so by all means, do not practice these remedies on babies, or if you have a serious medical condition.

Sore Throats and Coughs

Many women are hit harder and experience more sore throats than others. Whether it a result of juggling the children, working and maintaining the home, or whether they are just naturally prone to sore throats and a cough, honey can be a remedy for the minor sore throat and cough. Simply make a cough syrup by boiling one whole lemon. Once the lemon has cooled juice the lemon into an air tight container. Add one cup of honey into the container and mix well. Take two tablespoons of the mixture ever four hours.

Sinus and Stomach Problems

As a woman you also know how uncomfortable sinus and stomach problems can be. The sinus especially can be humiliating for the woman who is constantly sniffling. A mixture of honey and vinegar will aid in helping to remedy the condition. Pour a glass of ice-cold apple juice and mix in one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and one tablespoon of honey and drink. The mixture will help to alleviate minor sinus and stomach ailments.

Other Conditions

Many women are faced with health challenges. Whether muscle or joint pain, Alzheimer’s, asthma, arthritis, hemorrhoids, high blood pressure, toothaches, cold, ulcers, high blood pressure, and so on, honey can help aid to heal the condition. A mixture of apple cider vinegar, garlic and honey are great for these conditions. In your blender, simply mix one cup apple cider vinegar, eight cloves of garlic, and one cup of raw honey on high speed for a minute or two. Seal the mixture and place in the refrigerator for five days. Take two teaspoonfuls in a glass of juice each morning before breakfast.

This is my husband

This is my husband's version of gnudi. Fresh sage and roasted tomatoes compliment the rich flavour.

This is a delicious recipe for gnudi.  Just reading the ingredients will make you want to try it.

Gnudi is similar to gnocchi but made without  potato. It it is perfect served for brunch or dinner.

Be sure to gather all your fresh ingredients.  It’s worth the flavour.

Click the link to see the recipe:

http://network.nationalpost.com/NP/blogs/toronto/archive/2010/04/24/mildred-temple-s-kitchen-shares-its-popular-gnudi-recipe.aspx

gravy pitcher

Adding whole meal flour helps to thicken sauces and gravies

Brown Gravy

Fry a chopped onion in a very little butter until a dark brown. (Do not  burn, or the flavour of the gravy will be spoilt.)

Drain off the fat and add 1/2 pint water.

Boil until the water is brown. Strain. Return to saucepan and add flavouring to taste.

A teaspoon of lemon juice and a tomato, skinned and cooked to pulp, are good additions. Or any vegetable stock may be used instead of the water.

If thick gravy be desired, mix a dessertspoonful wholemeal flour with a little cold water. Add the boiling stock to this. Return to
saucepan and boil for 3 minutes. Add a small piece of butter just before serving.

Another method: Add a little “browning” (see recipe) to any vegetable stock. Thicken. Read more »

Egg Cookery

Whisk the eggs lightly to a froth

Whisk the eggs lightly to a froth for an omelette

BUTTERED EGGS

3 eggs, 1 tablespoon milk, 1/2 oz. fresh butter.

Beat up the eggs and add the milk. Melt the butter in a small stew-pan.
When hot, pour in the eggs and stir until they begin to set. Have ready
some buttered toast. Pile on eggs and serve.

EGG ON TOMATO

1 egg, 2 medium tomatoes, butter.

Skin the tomatoes. Break into halves and put them, with a very small piece
of butter, into a small stew-pan. Close tightly, and cook slowly until
reduced to a pulp. Break the egg into a cup and slide gently on to the
tomato. Put on the stew-pan lid. The egg will poach in the steam arising
from the tomato.

DEVILLED EGGS

Boil eggs for 20 minutes. Remove shells. Cut in halves and take out the
yolks. Well mash yolks with a very little fresh butter, melted, and curry
powder to taste. Stuff the whites with the mixture, join halves together,
and arrange in a dish of watercress.

SCRAMBLED EGG AND TOMATO

Skin the tomatoes and cook to pulp as in the preceding recipe. Beat the
egg and stir it in to the hot tomato. Cook until just beginning to set.

OMELET, PLAIN

Whisk the egg or eggs lightly to a froth. Put enough butter in the
frying-pan to just cover when melted. When this is hot, pour the eggs into
it, and stir gently with a wooden spoon until it begins to set. Fold over
and serve.

SAVOURY OMELET

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely-chopped parsley or mixed herbs
  • 1/2 a very small onion (finely minced)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh butter.

Put butter in the omelet pan. Beat the eggs to a fine froth, stir in the
milk and parsley, and pour into the hot pan. Stir quickly to prevent
sticking. As soon as it sets, fold over and serve.

SWEET OMELET

Proceed as in recipe for Savoury Omelet, but substitute a dessertspoon
castor sugar for the onion and parsley. When set, put warm jam in the
middle. Fold over and serve.

SOUFFLÉ OMELET

2 eggs, 1 dessertspoon castor sugar, grated yellow part of rind of 1/2
lemon, butter.

Separate the yolks from the whites of the eggs. Beat the yolks and add
sugar and lemon. Whisk the whites to a stiff froth. Mix very gently with
the yolks. Pour into hot buttered pan. Fold over and serve when set. Put
jam in middle or not, as preferred.

BOILED EGGS FOR INVALIDS

Put the egg on in cold water. As soon as it boils take the saucepan off
the fire and stand on one side for 5 minutes. At the end of this time the
egg will be found to be very lightly, but thoroughly, cooked.

Potatoes are best mashed after steaming

Potatoes are best mashed after steaming

Scrub well and steam, either with or without peeling. If peeled, this
should be done very thinly, as the greater part of the valuable potash
salts lie just under the skin.

BAKED

Moderate-sized potatoes take from 45 to 60 minutes. If peeled
before baking, cut in halves and put on a greased tin with a little
nut-fat or butter on each. Read more »

Too much sugar spoils the taste of the fruit in homemade jam

Too much sugar spoils the taste of the fruit in homemade jam

Jam simply consists of fresh fruit boiled with a half to two-thirds its
weight of white cane sugar until the mixture jellies.

Nearly every housekeeper has her own recipe for jam. One that I know of
uses a whole pound of sugar to a pound of fruit and boils it for nearly
two hours. The result is a very stiff, sweet jam, much more like shop jam
than home-made jam. Its only recommendation is that it will keep for an
unlimited time. Some recipes include water. But unless distilled water can
be procured, it is better not to dilute the fruit. Read more »

Curry Recipes

Curry is delicious served with plain white boiled rice

Curry is delicious served with plain white boiled rice

CURRY POWDER

  • 3 ozs. coriander seed
  • 2-1/2 ozs. tumeric
  • 1 oz. black pepper
  • 1/2 oz. lesser cardamoms
  • 1/4 oz. cinnamon
  • 1/4 oz. cumin seed

Put the ingredients into a cool oven and let them remain there all night.
Next day pound them thoroughly in a marble mortar, and rub through a
sieve. Put the powder into a well-corked bottle.

A spice machine may be used instead of the mortar, but in that case the
tumeric should be obtained ready powdered, as it is so hard that it is apt
to break the machine.

EGG CURRY

  • 1 large onion
  • 1 dessertspoon curry powder
  • 1 oz. butter or nutter
  • 3 hard-boiled eggs
  • 1 dessertspoon tomato pulp
  • 1 teacup water.

Shred the onion, put it in the stew-pan with the butter, sprinkle the
curry powder over, and fry gently until quite brown. Shell the eggs and
cut them in halves. Add the eggs, the tomato pulp, and the water. Stir
well, and simmer until the liquid is reduced to one-half. This will take
about 15 minutes.

Serve with plain boiled unpolished rice.


GERMAN LENTIL CURRY

Use the ingredients given, and proceed exactly the same as for egg curry.
But in place of eggs, take 1  cup of cold cooked German lentils
(see recipe for cooking lentils). Use also 2 teacups water in place of the
1, and only 3/4 oz. butter or nutter.

VEGETABLE CURRY

Use the ingredients given and proceed the same as for German lentil curry,
using any cold steamed vegetables in season. The best curry, according to
an Indian authority in cooking, is one made of potatoes, artichokes, carrots, pumpkin
and tomatoes. Read more »

Different thickness of soup, require different methods of preparation

Different thickness of soup, require different methods of preparation

Soups are of three kinds: clear soups, thick soups, and purées. A clear
soup is made by boiling fruit or vegetables (celery, for example) until
all the nourishment is extracted, and then straining off the clear liquid.
A little sago or macaroni is generally added and cooked in this.
When carrots and turnips are used, a few small pieces are cut into dice or
fancy shapes, cooked separately, and added to the strained soup. Thick
soups always include some farinaceous ingredients for thickening (flour,
pea-flour, potato, etc.). Purées are thick soups composed of any vegetable
or vegetables boiled and rubbed through a sieve. This is done, a little at
a time, with a wooden spoon. A little of the hot liquor is added to the
vegetable from time to time to assist it through. Read more »